Indian Journal of Medical Research

CLINICAL IMAGE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 152  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 90--91

Extra lower limb - A rare parasitic twin variety


Ashish Chhabra 
 Pediatric Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College & Hospital, Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Faridkot 151 203, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Chhabra
Pediatric Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College & Hospital, Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Faridkot 151 203, Punjab
India




How to cite this article:
Chhabra A. Extra lower limb - A rare parasitic twin variety.Indian J Med Res 2020;152:90-91


How to cite this URL:
Chhabra A. Extra lower limb - A rare parasitic twin variety. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Sep 27 ];152:90-91
Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2020/152/7/90/316713


Full Text

A 20 day old female child† presented to the Pediatric Surgery outpatient department in Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, India, in March 2015, with an extra right lower limb. A parasitic limb having a malformed foot was originating from the anterolateral aspect of the right inguinal region [Figure 1]. The right lower limb bearing club foot was shorter and had restricted mobility due to the overlying parasitic limb. Pelvic X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging showed normal hip joint, femur and thigh muscles of parasitic limb, however muscles and bones of the leg region were hypoplastic [Figure 2] and [Figure 3]. The child underwent surgery in the form of 'Parasitic Limb Disarticulation' so as to prevent the right lower limb from 'Steal syndrome'. Exploration revealed a well-formed hip joint, neurovascular bundle and musculature [Figure 4] and [Figure 5]. The baby recovered well, and on six months follow up showed improvement in the function and growth of the preserved right lower limb.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Figure 3}{Figure 4}{Figure 5}

Neonates with this rare parasitic twin anomaly should be offered early surgical intervention to prevent the 'Steal syndrome' and the resultant decrease in the growth and functionality of the ipsilateral normal limb.

Conflicts of Interest: None.