Indian Journal of Medical Research

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 149  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 263--269

Current antibiotic use in the treatment of enteric fever in children


Sushila Dahiya1, Rooma Malik1, Priyanka Sharma1, Archana Sashi2, Rakesh Lodha3, Sushil Kumar Kabra3, Seema Sood1, Bimal Kumar Das1, Kamini Walia4, VC Ohri4, Arti Kapil1 
1 Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Paediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
4 Division of Epidemiology & Communicable Diseases, Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr Arti Kapil
Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110 029
India

Background & objectives: Antimicrobial resistance is a major challenge in the treatment of typhoid fever with limited choices left to empirically treat these patients. The present study was undertaken to determine the current practices of antibiotic use in children attending a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This was a descriptive observational study in children suffering from enteric fever as per the case definition including clinical and laboratory parameters. The antibiotic audit in hospitalized children was measured as days of therapy per 1000 patient days and in outpatient department (OPD) as antibiotic prescription on the treatment card. Results: A total of 128 children with enteric fever were included in the study, of whom, 30 were hospitalized and 98 were treated from OPD. The mean duration of fever was 9.5 days at the time of presentation. Of these, 45 per cent were culture positive with Salmonella Typhi being aetiological agent in 68 per cent followed by S. Paratyphi A in 32 per cent. During hospitalization, the average length of stay was 10 days with mean duration of defervescence 6.4 days. Based on antimicrobial susceptibility ceftriaxone was given to 28 patients with mean duration of treatment being six days. An additional antibiotic was needed in six patients due to clinical non-response. In OPD, 79 patients were prescribed cefixime and additional antibiotic was needed in five during follow up visit. Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, ceftriaxone and cefixime seemed to be the first line of antibiotic treatment for typhoid fever. Despite susceptibility, clinical non-response was seen in around 10 per cent of the patients who needed combinations of antibiotics.


How to cite this article:
Dahiya S, Malik R, Sharma P, Sashi A, Lodha R, Kabra SK, Sood S, Das BK, Walia K, Ohri V C, Kapil A. Current antibiotic use in the treatment of enteric fever in children.Indian J Med Res 2019;149:263-269


How to cite this URL:
Dahiya S, Malik R, Sharma P, Sashi A, Lodha R, Kabra SK, Sood S, Das BK, Walia K, Ohri V C, Kapil A. Current antibiotic use in the treatment of enteric fever in children. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Oct 26 ];149:263-269
Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/article.asp?issn=0971-5916;year=2019;volume=149;issue=2;spage=263;epage=269;aulast=Dahiya;type=0