Indian Journal of Medical Research

CLINICAL IMAGES
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 139  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 788-

Triple torus palatinus


Wen-Sen Lai1, Cheng-Ping Shih2,  
1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei; Taichung Armed forces General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
2 Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Cheng-Ping Shih
Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei
Taiwan




How to cite this article:
Lai WS, Shih CP. Triple torus palatinus.Indian J Med Res 2014;139:788-788


How to cite this URL:
Lai WS, Shih CP. Triple torus palatinus. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Mar 9 ];139:788-788
Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2014/139/5/788/136458


Full Text

A 54 year old asymptomatic woman presented with three incidentally noted intraoral masses in January 2013, in the outpatients department of Olaryngology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. The patient's medical history was unremarkable. She reported no associated pain, pruritus, or other symptoms. Clinical examination revealed three hard, sessile nodules with normal overlying mucosa on the hard palate [Figure 1]. No notable abnormalities were identified on radiographs. Torus palatinus, the most common intraoral exostosis among postmenopausal women, is a non pathologic bony overgrowth in the midpalatine region. The growth of torus palatinus is gradual, becoming greater in the second or the third decade of life. The torus palatinus can be unilobular or polylobulated, as well as flat or spindle-shaped. Removal of the palatal tori is not always necessary except for offering patients another alternative for rehabilitating the jaw by means of a prosthetic implant. Since this patient was asymptomatic, no surgical intervention was required.{Figure 1}