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CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 152  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 65-66

A new clinical sign for posterior extrusion of talus


1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College & Associated Lok Nayak Hospital & Sushrut Trauma Center, Government of NCT of Delhi, New Delhi 110 002, India
2 Department of Orthopaedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110 029, India

Date of Submission09-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication25-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Sumit Arora
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College & Associated Lok Nayak Hospital & Sushrut Trauma Center, Government of NCT of Delhi, New Delhi 110 002
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2025_19

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How to cite this article:
Arora S, Krishna A. A new clinical sign for posterior extrusion of talus. Indian J Med Res 2020;152, Suppl S1:65-6

How to cite this URL:
Arora S, Krishna A. A new clinical sign for posterior extrusion of talus. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jul 30];152, Suppl S1:65-6. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2020/152/7/65/316748

Patient's consent obtained to publish clinical information and images.


A 24 yr old male presented to the Emergency department of Sushrut Trauma Center, New Delhi, India, in October 2019, with ankle trauma following fall from height. He had acute flexion of great toe at the interphalangeal joint. Radiographs [Figure 1] and computed tomography [Figure 2] revealed neck of talus fracture with posterior extrusion of talar body. The flexion of great toe persisted even after spinal anaesthesia [Figure 3]. He underwent lag screw fixation with medial malleolar osteotomy using combined anteromedial and anterolateral approaches. The fracture united after four months, but the patient remained on follow up for signs of avascular necrosis.
Figure 1: Anteroposterior (A) and lateral (B) view radiographs of the ankle showing fracture neck of talus with posterior extrusion of talar body.

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Figure 2: Sagittal (A) and axial (B) views of non-contrast computed tomography showing fracture neck of talus with posterior extrusion of talar body.

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Figure 3: Clinical photograph after spinal anaesthesia showing persistent acute flexion of interphalangeal joint of the right great toe (arrow).

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The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL), as it passes through the groove located between posteromedial and posterolateral tubercle of the talus, gets tented up with extrusion of the talus posteriorly. Other tendons on the posterior aspect of ankle get pushed aside and do not come in the way.

Conflicts of Interest: None.


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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