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CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 152  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 59

Tracheostomal myiasis: A rare clinical entity


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Aster Medcity, Kochi 682 027, Kerala, India
2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Aster Medcity, Kochi 682 027, Kerala, India

Date of Submission08-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication25-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Praveen Gopinath
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Aster Medcity, Kochi 682 027, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1909_19

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How to cite this article:
Rathish B, Gopinath P. Tracheostomal myiasis: A rare clinical entity. Indian J Med Res 2020;152, Suppl S1:59

How to cite this URL:
Rathish B, Gopinath P. Tracheostomal myiasis: A rare clinical entity. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Aug 4];152, Suppl S1:59. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2020/152/7/59/316739

Patient's consent obtained to publish clinical information and images.


A 79 yr old male who was a known case of motor neurone disease with bulbar and bilateral vocal cord palsy underwent a tracheostomy one and a half years ago presented to the Emergency Department at Aster Medcity, Kochi, India, in September 2019. Presenting symptoms included continuous secretions from his tracheostomy tube and breathing difficulty for the last one month. Examination of the tube showed necrotic stoma with bleeding around the tube and the presence of numerous maggots around the tube. Around 60 maggots were removed [Figure 1]A and [Figure 1]B and stoma cleaned using povidone-iodine [Figure 1]C. Local turpentine oil application was also done. The maggot larvae were identified to be that of Calliphoridae species. With regular stoma care and turpentine oil application, the patient improved. Follow up after two weeks revealed clean stoma site free of maggots and improved general clinical condition.
Figure 1: (A) The presence of maggots in tracheostomy wound (red arrow). (B) The maggots being removed from the stoma (red arrow). (C) Debrided clean wound after turpentine oil application (red arrow).

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Conflicts of Interest: None.


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