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CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 152  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 221

Toxic epidermal necrolysis - Managed successively in a remote rural hospital in Assam


Department of Pediatrics, Makunda Christian Leprosy & General Hospital, Karimganj 788 727, Assam, India

Date of Submission20-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication25-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
T Shajin
Department of Pediatrics, Makunda Christian Leprosy & General Hospital, Karimganj 788 727, Assam
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2365_19

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How to cite this article:
Shajin T, Vamshi T. Toxic epidermal necrolysis - Managed successively in a remote rural hospital in Assam. Indian J Med Res 2020;152, Suppl S1:221

How to cite this URL:
Shajin T, Vamshi T. Toxic epidermal necrolysis - Managed successively in a remote rural hospital in Assam. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jul 30];152, Suppl S1:221. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2020/152/7/221/316839

Consent to publish clinical information and image obtained from patient's parent


A seven yr old male child presented to department of Pediatrics, Makunda Christian Leprosy & General Hospital, Assam, India, during June 2018, with skin lesions all over the body. He was diagnosed to have toxic epidermal necrolysis [Figure 1]. He was managed with supportive care including dressings and nasogatric feeds, stopping the offending drug (cephalosporin) and by treating the infection. Eye care was also given, as it can be sight threatening. Corticosteroid was given during the acute management and the child went home normally [Figure 2]. He was followed up after two weeks at the review OPD and was found to be doing well. The incidence of toxic epidermal necrolysis is 1-2 cases per million population. The skin lesions and the risk of superadded skin infection can be life threatening. Toxic epidermal necrolysis can be managed in a secondary level hospital setting successively.
Figure 1: Skin lesions of the child at admission.

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Figure 2: The resolution of skin lesions at discharge.

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Conflicts of Interest: None.


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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