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CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 152  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 184-185

Giant haemangioma on base of tongue: A rare presentation


Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission20-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication25-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Parag Sahasrabudhe
Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2283_19

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How to cite this article:
Karanjkar AS, Sahasrabudhe P. Giant haemangioma on base of tongue: A rare presentation. Indian J Med Res 2020;152, Suppl S1:184-5

How to cite this URL:
Karanjkar AS, Sahasrabudhe P. Giant haemangioma on base of tongue: A rare presentation. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Aug 4];152, Suppl S1:184-5. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2020/152/7/184/316811

Patient's consent obtained to publish clinical information and images.


A 24 yr old male presented to the department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, India, in October 2016, with a solitary, progressive swelling over the tongue for the last 4–5 yr with difficulty in speech. Intraoral examination revealed a large solitary well-defined, firm-to-cystic globular swelling measuring approximately 7 × 7 × 5 cm at the base of the tongue [Figure 1]. Magnetic resonance imaging was inconclusive. The encapsulated mass was removed surgically via intraoral access only, thus avoiding morbid mandibulotomy. Histopathologically, it turned out to be cavernous haemangioma [Figure 2] and [Figure 3]. The patient was followed up over a period of two years with no recurrence and morbidity [Figure 4]. Haemangiomas are benign tumours of infancy and childhood. Base of the tongue is a rare site requiring special consideration in terms of functional problem. These are rarely grown to this large size and uncapsulated.
Figure 1: Solitary, well-defined, firm-to-cystic globular swelling arising from base of the tongue.

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Figure 2: Cut-surface showing greyish-white glistening areas along with areas of haemorrhage and necrosis.

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Figure 3: Section from the tongue mass revealing sub-capsular area of large cavernous spaces containing altered blood, suggestive of cavernous haemangioma of the tongue (H and E, ×10).

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Figure 4: At two years of follow up.

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Conflicts of Interest: None.


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4]



 

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