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CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 152  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 157

Parahaemophilia presenting as an interesting scalp swelling


Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Unit, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh160 012, India

Date of Submission11-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication25-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Amita Trehan
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Unit, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2243_19

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How to cite this article:
Roy PS, Trehan A. Parahaemophilia presenting as an interesting scalp swelling. Indian J Med Res 2020;152, Suppl S1:157

How to cite this URL:
Roy PS, Trehan A. Parahaemophilia presenting as an interesting scalp swelling. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Aug 4];152, Suppl S1:157. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2020/152/7/157/316792

Consent to publish clinical information and images obtained from patient's parent.


A five year old male child presented to the outpatient service in the department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, in April 2019 with complaints of enlarging head size since one month. Diffuse boggy lumpy-bumpy swellings were found over the entire scalp [Figure 1]. There was no history of trauma. General and systemic examination was normal. The coagulogram revealed prolongation of prothrombin time and activated prothrombin time, which remained uncorrected after administration of vitamin K. The liver function parameters were normal. Further tests confirmed parahaemophilia/factor V deficiency (levels 0.4%). There was no history of bleeding. On probing, a history of trivial trauma, before the enlarging head, was obtained. He was treated with fresh frozen plasma transfusion for three days. All scalp swellings had disappeared at follow up after two months [Figure 2]. To conclude, inherited bleeding disorders can have peculiar clinical presentations mimicking common childhood illnesses.
Figure 1: Diffuse, boggy scalp swelling at presentation.

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Figure 2: Complete disappearance of the swelling after at follow up two months.

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Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge Dr Jasmina Ahluwalia, department of Hematology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India, for laboratory workup.

Conflicts of Interest: None.


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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