Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 146  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 328-333

Management of malaria in pregnancy


Department of Medicine at the Doherty Institute, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Dr Stephen J Rogerson
Department of Medicine at the Doherty Institute, The University of Melbourne, 792 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000
Australia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1304_17

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Pregnant women are especially susceptible to malaria infection. Without existing immunity, severe malaria can develop requiring emergency treatment, and pregnancy loss is common. In semi-immune women, consequences of malaria for the mother include anaemia while stillbirth, premature delivery and foetal growth restriction affect the developing foetus. Preventive measures include insecticide-treated nets and (in some African settings) intermittent preventive treatment. Prompt management of maternal infection is key, using parenteral artemisinins for severe malaria, and artemisinin combination treatments (ACTs) in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. ACTs may soon also be recommended as an alternative to quinine as a treatment in the first trimester of pregnancy. Monitoring the safety of antimalarials and understanding their pharmacokinetics is particularly important in pregnancy with the altered maternal physiology and the risks to the developing foetus. As increasing numbers of countries embrace malaria elimination as a goal, the special needs of the vulnerable group of pregnant women and their infants should not be overlooked.


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