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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 143  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 374-375

Authors' response


1 Department of Epidemiology & Diabetology, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation & Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, Chennai, India
2 Department of Endocrinology, Lilavati Hospital, Mumbai, India
3 Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India
4 Department of Medicine, Indira Gandhi Government Medical College, Nagpur, India
5 Department of Diabetology, Diabetes Care Center, Ranchi, India
6 Department of Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences & GTB Hospital, Delhi, India
7 Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, India
8 Division of Non Communicable Diseases, Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India
9 Department of Endocrinology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, Puducherry, India
10 ,

Date of Web Publication19-May-2016

Correspondence Address:
Viswanathan Mohan
Department of Epidemiology & Diabetology, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation & Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, Chennai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.182632

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How to cite this article:
Pradeepa R, Anjana RM, Joshi SR, Bhansali A, Deepa M, Joshi PP, Dhandania VK, Madhu SV, Rao PV, Geetha L, Subashini R, Unnikrishnan R, Shukla DK, Kaur T, Mohan V, Das AK, fI. Authors' response. Indian J Med Res 2016;143:374-5

How to cite this URL:
Pradeepa R, Anjana RM, Joshi SR, Bhansali A, Deepa M, Joshi PP, Dhandania VK, Madhu SV, Rao PV, Geetha L, Subashini R, Unnikrishnan R, Shukla DK, Kaur T, Mohan V, Das AK, fI. Authors' response. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Oct 20];143:374-5. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2016/143/3/374/182632

We thank Rathi et al1 for their comments on our article on obesity in urban and rural India2. We agree with the authors that adulthood and childhood obesity has risen to alarming levels globally as well as nationally and it has a short and long term impact on health . The weight gain in childhood tracks into adulthood, thus increasing the risk of metabolic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hypertension[3].

As the ICMR-INDIAB study was planned to evaluate adults of either gender, aged 20 years and above in all the 28 states (now 29 states) of India, the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi

and two Union Territories (UTs) namely Chandigarh and Puducherry in the mainland of India (phased manner), data on childhood obesity were not available. However, our group through the Obesity Reduction and Awareness and screening of Noncommunicable diseases through Group Education in children and adolescents (ORANGE ) project has screened 18,955 children (age 6-11 yr) and adolescents (age 12-17 yr) across 51 schools (31 private and 20 government) of Chennai, Tamil Nadu, for obesity and other metabolic NCDs4. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 15.4 and 18.1 per cent among children and adolescents, respectively, while the prevalence was significantly higher in private (21.4%) compared to government schools (3.6%)5. This study has shown that the epidemic of childhood obesity is now spreading to the low socio-economic groups as well. In addition, we also studied 368 childhood and adolescent -onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (CAT2DM) registered at our center and reported that 56 per cent of boys and 50.4 per cent of girls were >85th percentile of body mass index for age[6]. Overweight and obese children are more likely to become obese adults, and have a higher risk of morbidity, disability and premature mortality in adulthood compared to non obese children. A recent systemic review that investigated the ability of simple measures, such as body mass index (BMI), to predict the persistence of obesity from childhood into adulthood reported that obesity (measured using BMI) was found to persist from childhood to adulthood , with most obese adolescents also being obese in adulthood 7.

Studies have shown that short term consequences are mostly represented by psychological effects and long term effect is represented by the fact that childhood obesity continues into adulthood obesity and this results in negative effects in young adult life, since obesity increases the risk to develop morbidity and premature mortality[8]. In addition to suffering from poor physical health, overweight/ obese children can often be targets of early social discrimination. Regarding management of childhood obesity, medical treatment should be discouraged and lifestyle changes such as dietary changes and increased physical activity should be recommended.

As India is now waking up to this epidemic of childhood obesity, existing gaps in knowledge regarding prevention strategies for this age group should be addressed and evidence-based interventions that can be successful and sustainable in the Indian setting should be implemented.

 
   References Top

1.
Rathi P, Pawar S, Contractor Q. Wiser to prevent childhood obesity. Indian J Med Res 2016; 143 : 373.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Pradeepa R, Anjana RM, Joshi SR, Bhansali A, Deepa M, Joshi PP, et al. ICMR-INDIAB Collaborative Study Group. Prevalence of generalized & abdominal obesity in urban & rural India- the ICMR - INDIAB Study (Phase-I) [ICMR- INDIAB-3]. Indian J Med Res 2015; 142 : 139-50.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Singh AS, Mulder C, Twisk JW, Mechelen VW, Chinapaw MJ. Tracking of childhood overweight into adulthood: A systematic review of the literature. Obes Rev 2008; 9 : 474-88.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Sonya J, Ranjani H, Pradeepa R, Mohan V. Obesity reduction and Awareness and Screening of Noncommunicable Diseases through Group Education in children and adolescents (ORANGE): methodology paper (ORANGE-1). J Diabetes Sci Technol 2010; 4 : 1256-64.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Jagadesan S, Harish R, Miranda P, Unnikrishnan R, Anjana RM, Mohan V. Prevalence of overweight and obesity among school children and adolescents in Chennai. Indian Pediatr 2014; 51 : 544-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Amutha A, Datta M, Unnikrishnan R, Anjana RM, Mohan V. Clinical profile and complications of childhood- and adolescent-onset type 2 diabetes seen at a diabetes center in south India. Diabetes Technol Ther 2012; 14 : 497-504.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Simmonds M, Burch J, Llewellyn A, Griffiths C, Yang H, Owen C, et al. The use of measures of obesity in childhood for predicting obesity and the development of obesity-related diseases in adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Health Technol Assess 2015; 19 : 1-336.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Orio F, Tafuri D, Ascione A, Marciano F, Savastano S, Colarieti G, et al. Lifestyle changes in the management of adulthood and childhood obesity. Minerva Endocrinol 2014; Dec 17 (Epub).  Back to cited text no. 8
    




 

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