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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 136  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 881

Vaccine vial monitors in adverse field environment


Sant Parmanand Hospital, Delhi 110 054, India

Date of Web Publication2-Jan-2013

Correspondence Address:
Subhash C Arya
Sant Parmanand Hospital, Delhi 110 054
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 23287139

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How to cite this article:
Arya SC, Agarwal N. Vaccine vial monitors in adverse field environment. Indian J Med Res 2012;136:881

How to cite this URL:
Arya SC, Agarwal N. Vaccine vial monitors in adverse field environment. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Oct 20];136:881. Available from: https://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2012/136/5/881/105419

Sir,

We compliment investigators at the St Stephen's Hospital and the National Institute of Immunology [1] for their meticulous investigations involving frequent exposures of poliovirus vaccine aliquots to high temperatures to assess utility of vaccine vial monitors (VVM) in conditions mimicking those encountered during field usage. Obviously, it would be improper to rely on VVM all the times as these would work on the chemical changes induced by heat. These are thermal and not biological indicators, and thus could be fallible. The VVMs do not reflect any evaporative and radiative transfer (in the form of electromagnetic radiation) of heat from atmosphere. An exclusive monitoring of temperature without a watch on humidity, atmospheric pressure, air velocity, exposure to sunlight or radiation would be unrealistic.

Exposure to rigours of temperature would not mimic the environment likely to be encountered during field usage of vaccines. Monitoring temperature without an estimate of the prevailing humidity could be fallacious. For example, during the heat wave in Chicago in 1995, the atmospheric temperature was 40°C but the heat index; an estimate of evaporative and radiative transfer was 40.3°C [2] .

In conclusion, to protect ingredients of vaccine vials in field, relying on any thermal based indicators like VVM may not be appropriate as these would not indicate exposures to rigours of temperature [1] , humidity and atmospheric pressure that happen universally.

 
   References Top

1.Shrivastava A, Gupta N, Upadhyay P, Puliyel J. Caution needed in using oral polio vaccine beyond the cold chain: Vaccine vial monitors may be unreliable at high temperatures. Indian J Med Res 2012; 135 : 520-2.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Heat-related mortality, Chicago, July 1995. MMWR 1995; 44 : 577-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    




 

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