Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
  Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login  
  Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users Online: 1294    
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 131  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 350-365

Nocturnal hypoventilation - identifying & treating syndromes


Respiratory Failure Service, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Camperdown, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Amanda J Piper
Respiratory Failure Service, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Camperdown, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Australia

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 20308760

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Nocturnal hypoventilation is a common feature of disorders affecting the function of the diaphragm or central respiratory drive mechanisms. The ensuing change in gas exchange is initially confined to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but over time buffering of the raised carbon dioxide produces a secondary depression of respiratory drive that will further reduce ventilation not only during sleep but eventually during wakefulness as well. Failure to identify and treat nocturnal hypoventilation results in impairments in daytime function, quality of life and premature mortality. While some simple daytime tests of respiratory function can identify at risk individuals, these cannot predict the nature or severity of any sleep disordered breathing present. Nocturnal monitoring of gas exchange with or without full polysomnography is the only way to comprehensively assess this disorder, especially in the early stages of its evolution. Non invasive ventilation used during sleep is the most appropriate approach to reverse the consequences of nocturnal hypoventilation, although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may be effective in those individuals where a significant degree of upper airway obstruction is present. When appropriately selected patients use therapy on a regular basis, significant improvements in quality of life, exercise capacity and survival can be achieved, irrespective of the underlying disease process.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed309    
    Printed27    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded1384    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal