Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 128  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 353-372

Carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium


1 Wise Laboratory of Environmental & Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104; Maine Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104
2 Wise Laboratory of Environmental & Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104; Maine Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104; Department of Applied Medical Sciences, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104, USA

Correspondence Address:
J P Wise
Wise Laboratory of Environmental & Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104; Maine Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104; Department of Applied Medical Sciences, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., Portland, ME 04104, USA

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 19106434

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Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a commonly used industrial metal, is a well known human lung carcinogen. Epidemiology and animal studies suggest that the particulate Cr(VI) compounds, specifically the water insoluble compounds, are the more potent carcinogens; however, the carcinogenic mechanism remains unknown. Here we summarize recent Cr(VI)-induced human tumour, in vivo, cell culture and in vitro studies and put the data into context with three major paradigms of carcinogenesis: multistage carcinogenesis, genomic instability, and epigenetic modifications. Based on these studies, we propose a mechanism for chromate carcinogenesis that is primarily driven by the genomic instability paradigm.


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