Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
  Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login  
  Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users Online: 2364       
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 124  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 619-630

Emergence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as an epidemic in India


Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Surinder K Jindal
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research Chandigarh, India

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17287549

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hitherto underdiagnosed in India, is now recognized in 4-10 per cent of adult male population of India and several other Asian countries. The Regional COPD Working Group for 12 Asia Pacific Countries and Regions used a COPD prevalence model and estimated an overall prevalence rate of 6.3 per cent with a range from 3.5 to 6.7 per cent. The smoking associations with COPD were high from most countries i.e., 2.65 in India, 2.57 in China and 2.12 in Japan. In a large, multicentric study from India, the population prevalence of COPD was 4.1 per cent of 35295 subjects with a male to female ratio of 1.56:1. Almost all forms of smoking products such as cigarettes and 'bidis' used in different States were found to be significantly associated with COPD. In non-smokers, especially women, exposures to indoor air pollution from domestic combustion of solid fuels was an important factor. More significantly the exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was an established cause for COPD. The odds ratio for risk from ETS exposure in non-smokers (1.535) was on significant during both the childhood and the adulthood. On an average, an Indian COPD patient spent about 15 per cent of his income on smoking products and up to 30 per cent on disease management. Tobacco smoking was also the most frequent cause of chronic cor pulmonale which occurred as a long term complication of COPD both amongst men and women.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed209    
    Printed18    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded305    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal