Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
  Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login  
  Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users Online: 3826       
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 150  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 612-619

A virus precipitation method for concentration & detection of avian influenza viruses from environmental water resources & its possible application in outbreak investigations


1 ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Mumbai Unit (Formerly Enterovirus Research Center), Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Avian Influenza Group, ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Microbial Containment Complex, Pune, Maharashtra, India
3 Diagnostic Virology Group, ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Microbial Containment Complex, Pune, Maharashtra, India
4 ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Kerala Unit, Government TD Medical College Hospital, Alappuzha, Kerala, India
5 Hepatitis Group, ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Microbial Containment Complex, Pune, Maharashtra, India
6 ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Microbial Containment Complex, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr Shailesh D Pawar
ICMR-National Institute of Virology-Mumbai Unit (Formerly Enterovirus Research Center), Mumbai, 400 012, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1697_18

Rights and Permissions

Background & objectives: Avian influenza (AI) viruses have been a major cause of public health concern. Wild migratory birds and contaminated environmental sources such as waterbodies soiled with bird droppings play a significant role in the transmission of AI viruses. The objective of the present study was to develop a sensitive and user-friendly method for the concentration and detection of AI viruses from environmental water sources. Methods: Municipal potable water, surface water from reservoirs and sea were spiked with low pathogenic AI viruses. To concentrate the viruses by precipitation, a combination of potassium aluminium sulphate with milk powder was used. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for virus detection, and the results were compared with a virus concentration method using erythrocytes. Drinking water specimens from poultry markets were also tested for the presence of AI viruses. Results: A minimum of 101.0 EID50(50% egg infectious dose)/ml spiked H5N1 and 101.7 EID50/ml spiked H9N2 viruses were detected from spiked potable water; 101.0 and 102.0 EID50/ml spiked H5N1 virus was detected from surface water and seawater samples, respectively. The present method was more sensitive than the erythrocyte-binding method as approximately 10-fold higher infectious virus titres were obtained. AI H9N2 viruses were detected and isolated from water from local poultry markets, using this method. Interpretation & conclusions: Viability and recovery of the spiked viruses were not affected by precipitation. The present method may be suitable for the detection of AI viruses from different environmental water sources and can also be applied during outbreak investigations.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed225    
    Printed1    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded51    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal