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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 150  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 412-416

Incidence & management practices of snakebite: A retrospective study at Sub-District Hospital, Dahanu, Maharashtra, India


1 Department of Clinical Research, ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health, Mumbai; Model Rural Health Research Unit, Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India, India
2 Department of Clinical Research, ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health, Mumbai, India
3 Sub District Hospital, Dahanu, District Palghar, Public Health Department, Government of Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr Rahul Gajbhiye
Department of Clinical Research, ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health, Jehangir Merwanji Street, Parel, Mumbai 400 012, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1148_18

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This study was undertaken to know the incidence and management practices of snakebite envenomation at the First Referral Unit - Sub-District Hospital, Dahanu, Maharashtra, India. Retrospective analysis of snakebite case records (n=145) was carried out for one-year period (January to December 2014). The annual incidence of snakebite was 36 per 100,000 population with case fatality rate of 4.5 per cent. Venomous snakebites were 76 per cent and non-venomous snakebites were 24 per cent. Overall, snakebites were more common in males (52.4%) than females (47.6%). Majority of the snakebites (66%) were in the age group of 18-45 yr. Seasonal variation was observed with highest snakebites in monsoon (58%). Lower extremities were the most common site of bites (63%). Neurotoxic and vasculotoxic envenomation were reported in 19 and 27 per cent snakebite cases, respectively. Anti-snake venom (ASV) was administered at an average dose of 7.5±0.63 vials (range 2-40, median 6). There was no uniform protocol followed for ASV administration as per the National Snakebite Management Protocol of Government of India (2009).


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