Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
  Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login  
  Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users Online: 1550       
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 148  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 64-70

Postpartum uterine infection & ovarian dysfunction


Molecular Endocrinology, Functional Genomics & System Biology Laboratory, Animal Biochemistry Division, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr Dheer Singh
Molecular Endocrinology, Functional Genomics & System Biology Laboratory, Animal Biochemistry Division, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal 132 001, Haryana
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_961_18

Rights and Permissions

Postpartum uterine infections such as metritis, endometritis and mastitis have been considered as underlying causes for ovarian dysfunction in mammals. Almost all mammals, particularly dairy animals are susceptible to postpartum uterine infections, resulting in impaired fertility and economic loss. One of the factors for low fertility in females is ovarian dysfunction, which is exhibited as impaired growth and function of ovarian follicles by the postpartum infection. Immune system of mammals provides a host defence mechanism against pathogenic microbes through the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and forming inflammasomes. Like immune cells, ovarian granulosa cells also exhibit a similar pattern of cytokine gene expressions on exposure to PAMPs. Genome-wide transcriptomic approaches explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune function of buffalo granulosa cells during endotoxin exposure. Understanding the molecular mechanism of ovarian dysfunction due to uterine infection would be helpful to implement various strategies to handle the adverse effects of postpartum uterine disease on fertility by developing potential therapeutics. Therefore, this article focuses on key factors that are responsible for postpartum infection and particularly summarizes the molecular mechanism of infection underlying the ovarian dysfunction in dairy animals.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed869    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded63    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal