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CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 145  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 148

An unusual vesical stone


1 Department of Urology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences, Shillong 793 018, Meghalaya, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences, Shillong 793 018, Meghalaya, India

Date of Submission11-Sep-2015
Date of Web Publication30-May-2017

Correspondence Address:
Stephen Lalfakzuala Sailo
Department of Urology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences, Shillong 793 018, Meghalaya
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1452_15

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How to cite this article:
Sailo SL, Sailo L. An unusual vesical stone. Indian J Med Res 2017;145:148

How to cite this URL:
Sailo SL, Sailo L. An unusual vesical stone. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 May 28];145:148. Available from: http://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2017/145/1/148/207229

A 39 yr old male presented to the department of Urology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences, Shillong, India, in October 2014, with poor urinary stream, dysuria and haematuria for three years. Clinical examination was unremarkable. Urine microscopy showed haematuria and leukocyturia. Pelvic radiograph showed a bladder stone with a foreign body at the centre [Figure 1]. On cystolithotomy, a 4 cm × 3 cm stone with a needle [Figure 2] was removed. When the stone was fragmented, a hypodermic needle was found forming a nidus for the stone [Figure 3]. The patient had an uneventful recovery. He was asymptomatic at three month follow up. Although he denied it, he possibly inserted the needle through the urethra. His psychiatric evaluation was normal.
Figure 1: Pelvic radiograph showing a vesical stone with a foreign body at the centre (arrow).

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Figure 2: A vesical stone with a needle (arrow).

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Figure 3: A hypodermic needle was found after the stone was fragmented.

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    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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