Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
  Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login  
  Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users Online: 1806       
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 144  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 815-822

Respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a non-invasive index of 'brain-heart' interaction in stress


1 Department of Physiology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin (JFM CU); Biomedical Center Martin JFM CU, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovak Republic
2 Biomedical Center Martin JFM CU, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovak Republic
3 Paediatric Cardiology, Martin, Slovak Republic

Correspondence Address:
Alexander Jurko
Paediatric Cardiology, Kollarova 13, 036 01 Martin
Slovak Republic
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1447_14

Rights and Permissions

Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is accepted as a peripheral marker of cardiac-linked parasympathetic regulation. According to polyvagal theory, the RSA is also considered as the index of emotion regulation. The neurovisceral integration model posits that parasympathetic modulation of the heart marked by RSA is related to complex nervous regulation associated with emotional and cognitive processing. From this perspective, high resting RSA amplitude associated with a greater withdrawal during stressors and subsequent recovery could represent a flexible and adaptive physiological response system to a challenge. Conversely, low resting RSA accompanied by an inadequate reactivity to stress might reflect maladaptive regulatory mechanisms. The RSA reactivity is different with various types of stressors: while the RSA decreases to cognitive tasks indicating a vagal withdrawal, the RSA magnitude increases to emotional challenge indicating an effective cognitive processing of emotional stimuli. The RSA reactivity to stress could have important implications for several mental disorders, e.g. depressive or anxiety disorder. It seems that the study of the RSA, as a non-invasive index of 'brain-heart' communication, could provide important information on the pathway linked to mental and physical health.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2225    
    Printed3    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded463    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 6    

Recommend this journal