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   Table of Contents      
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 142  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 93-94

Authors' response


1 Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Seth GS Medical College & KEM Hospital, Mumbai 400 012, Maharasthra, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Seth GS Medical College & KEM Hospital, Mumbai 400 012, Maharasthra, India

Date of Web Publication4-Aug-2015

Correspondence Address:
Urmila M Thatte
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Seth GS Medical College & KEM Hospital, Mumbai 400 012, Maharasthra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 26261176

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How to cite this article:
Taur SR, Karande S, Saxena AA, Gogtay NJ, Thatte UM. Authors' response. Indian J Med Res 2015;142:93-4

How to cite this URL:
Taur SR, Karande S, Saxena AA, Gogtay NJ, Thatte UM. Authors' response. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Jun 20];142:93-4. Available from: http://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2015/142/1/93/162148

We thank Raina [1] for his comment on our article on the use of computerized tests to evaluate psychomotor performance in children with SpLD [2] . He pointed out that the matching of the two groups for computer literacy was not done. We did, in fact, anticipate its potential influence on the study outcome at the time of designing the protocol. However, computer literacy is quite complex and involves the testing of at least six domains- MS Word, MS PowerPoint, MS Excel, Operating Systems (Windows), internet and e-mail [3] . It would not have been possible to apply this to the age group we studied. Instruments for psychomotor tests until a few decades ago were actual playing cards (for example) that needed to be sorted by a child. The "computer" in our case was simply a means of putting multiple tests which were paper based in the past and, therefore, cumbersome to use, on a single platform for ease of use. The keyboard of Mindomatics TM instrument (M/s Sristek, Hyderabad, India) is very simple with very few keys and does not resemble a computer keyboard. Thus, Mindomatics TM is really not a computer in the true sense and testing for "computer literacy" would not only have been difficult and time consuming but also meaningless. All children were given training (3 sessions over 1 week) at baseline to acquaint them with the use of the keyboard and the various tests. This we believe addressed the issue of preconditioning across the groups adequately.

 
   References Top

1.
Raina SK. Confounding in case control studies. Indian J Med Res 2015; 142 : 93-4.   Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Taur S, Karande S, Saxena AA, Gogtay NJ, Thatte UM. Use of computerized tests to evaluate psychomotor performance in children with specific learning disabilities in comparison to normal children. Indian J Med Res 2014; 140 : 644-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ranasinghe P, Wickramasinghe SA, Pieris WR, Karunathilake I, Constantine GR.Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: a cross-sectional study. BMC Res Notes 2012; 5 : 504.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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