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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 142  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23-32

Alterations of mucosal microbiota in the colon of patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed by real time polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid


Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India

Correspondence Address:
Balakrishnan S Ramakrishna
Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 004, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.162091

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Background & objectives: Alterations in microbial communities closely associated with the intestinal mucosa are likely to be important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We examined the abundance of specific microbial populations in colonic mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and controls using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) amplification of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (16S rRNA). Methods: RNA was extracted from colonic mucosal biopsies of patients with UC (32), CD (28) and patients undergoing screening colonoscopy (controls), and subjected to RT-qPCR using primers targeted at 16S rRNA sequences specific to selected microbial populations. Results: Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas group and Enterobacteriaceae were the most abundant mucosal microbiota. Bacteroides and Lactobacillus abundance was greater in UC patients compared with controls or CD. Escherichia coli abundance was increased in UC compared with controls. Clostridium coccoides group and C. leptum group abundances were reduced in CD compared with controls. Microbial population did not differ between diseased and adjacent normal mucosa, or between untreated patients and those already on medical treatment. The Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio was significantly decreased in both UC and CD compared with controls, indicative of a dysbiosis in both conditions. Interpretation & conclusions: Dysbiosis appears to be a primary feature in both CD and UC. Microbiome-directed interventions are likely to be appropriate in therapy of IBD.


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