Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 141  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 488

Authors' response


1 School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh 160 012, India
2 Department of Hospital Administration, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh 160 012, India
3 Department of Biostatistics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh 160 012, India

Date of Web Publication24-Jun-2015

Correspondence Address:
Pramod K Gupta
Department of Biostatistics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
Sharma M, Goel S, Singh SK, Sharma R, Gupta PK. Authors' response. Indian J Med Res 2015;141:488

How to cite this URL:
Sharma M, Goel S, Singh SK, Sharma R, Gupta PK. Authors' response. Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Nov 12];141:488. Available from: http://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2015/141/4/488/159312

Sir,

We appreciate the author for his comments on our article [1] and also for his concern over generalization of the results. However, it is obvious that generalization of results of any study is limited only to the population under study. At the same time, the results could be equally applicable for any other population, which manifest similar characteristics. We thus consider that our study is not different on generalization. We, of course, cannot naturalize/globalize the results.

Another concern is about sampling of the two institutions in our study which is done through the convenience sampling. We agree with the author because of the non-probability nature of the convenience sampling. However, the important point to note was that the institutions were not the primary units. We used proper probabilistic sampling approach for selecting primary unit of the study. Hence, external validity stands intact for all those institutions in which underlined conditions are similar to the institutions selected in this study. The findings of this study thus calibrate the results not only of those few studies done in India but also in other parts of the world. Hence, mundane realism also stands intact under given setting, whereas validity of experimental realism, being a psychological quantity, is hard to challenge as the respondents knew that their identity would not be revealed.

 
   References Top

1.
Sharma M, Goel S, Singh SK, Sharma R, Gupta PK. Determinants of Indian physicians' satisfaction & dissatisfaction from their job. Indian J Med Res 2014; 139 : 409-17.  Back to cited text no. 1
    




 

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