Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 139  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 523-530

Tobacco cessation outcomes in a cohort of patients attending a chest medicine outpatient clinic in Bangalore city, southern India


1 Division of Epidemiology, St John's Research Institute, Bangalore, India
2 Departmens of Psychiatry, St John's Medical College Hospital, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India
3 Departmens of Chest Medicine, St John's Medical College Hospital, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
P. K. Mony
Associate Professor, Division of Epidemiology, St John's Research Institute, 100 feet road, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 24927338

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Background & objectives: Nicotine dependence is a widely prevalent and harmful chronic addictive disorder. Quitting tobacco use is however, uncommon in India. We present long-term treatment outcomes of out-patient, tobacco cessation treatments from a specialty clinic setting in southern India. Methods: Patients seen in a tobacco cessation clinic were characterized for tobacco use, nicotine dependence and motivation for quitting and offered pharmacologic/non-pharmacologic treatment. They were subsequently contacted telephonically at a mean (±standard deviation) of 24 (±9.1) months to assess tobacco cessation outcome defined as 'point prevalence of 1-month abstinence' by self-reporting. Results: The mean age of participants was 48.0 ±14.0 yr. Tobacco use distribution was: beedis only (22%), cigarettes only (49%), beedis and cigarettes (18%), chewing only (2%), and smoking and chewing (9%). Two-thirds had high level of nicotine dependence. Of the 189 patients enrolled, only 15 per cent attended follow up clinics. Only 106 (56%) patients were successfully contacted telephonically and 83 (44%) were lost to follow up. Self-reported point prevalence abstinence was 5 per cent by 'intent-to-treat' analysis and 10 per cent by 'responder' analysis. Two clinical parameters - high level of nicotine dependence [estimated by the heaviness of smoking index (HSI)] and the absence of vascular or other chronic disease were found to be associated with successful quitting; these were however, not significant on multivariate analysis. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study has identified low quit-rates in a cohort of patients attending a hospital-based tobacco cessation clinic. In the absence of clear-cut predictors of cessation with low quit-rates, there should be continued efforts to improve cessation outcomes and identify predictors for action.


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