Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
  Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login  
  Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users Online: 1945       

   Table of Contents      
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 137  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1207

Induced pluripotent stem cells: A new futuristic era towards orodental disorders


Department of Periodontology & Oral Implantology, SDD Hospital & Dental College Barwala 134 009, Haryana, India

Date of Web Publication4-Jul-2013

Correspondence Address:
Preetinder Singh
Department of Periodontology & Oral Implantology, SDD Hospital & Dental College Barwala 134 009, Haryana
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 23852304

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Singh P. Induced pluripotent stem cells: A new futuristic era towards orodental disorders . Indian J Med Res 2013;137:1207

How to cite this URL:
Singh P. Induced pluripotent stem cells: A new futuristic era towards orodental disorders . Indian J Med Res [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Nov 14];137:1207. Available from: http://www.ijmr.org.in/text.asp?2013/137/6/1207/114394

Sir,

Apropos of an article on stem cell therapy [1] published last year, I would like to add some more information about the use of this therapy in orodental disorders. It is believed that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) might demonstrate the potential for alleviating incurable diseases and aiding organ transplantation [2] . The first iPSCs generation was reported by Takahashi and Yamanaka [3] in 2006. They generated the iPSCs through simultaneous overexpression of a group of transcription factors using cell lines derived from mice. Initially the concept of utilizing iPSCs technology to model disease was mostly emphasized in neural degenerative diseases, which was then extended to other genetic disorders including immune system, muscular, blood, pancreas, skin, bone marrow, liver, lung, retinal, premature ageing, etc[3] . However, the concept of utilizing iPSC technology is still in its infancy for orodental disorders and diseases. Chronic degenerative dental diseases are very common in human populations and represent a major problem for public health. The iPSC technology could prove a boon for treating orodental disorders in coming future. Specific examples that are well documented include ectodermal dysplasia with dental manifestations of oligodontia and conical shaped teeth and cleidocranial dysplasia with multiple supernumerary and unerupted teeth [4],[5] . Current research points to a substantially higher relative risk of infant mortality among orodental disorders such as oral cleft cases in developing countries. Additional research is essential to determine the sources of these raised infant mortality rates and possible interventions to decrease them [6] . Possibly, iPSCs possess the potential for treating such genetic orodental disorders, confining the availability of suitable disease-specific iPSCs from the diseased person which are able to multiply, cooperate and reform the missing or diseased part. The regeneration of orodental tissues is dependent on factors such as appropriate signals, cells, blood supply, and scaffold that are needed to target the tissue at the site of defect [7] . iPSCs may become the most powerful therapeutic tools for achieving these factors. It is hoped that the research being done in the field of iPSCs will provide solutions in overcoming orodental disorders on a large scale worldwide.

 
   References Top

1.Gurudutta GU, Satija NK, Singh VK, Verma YK, Gupta P, Tripathi RP. Stem cell therapy: A novel & futuristic treatment modality for disaster injuries. Indian J Med Res 2012; 135 : 15-25.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Deng W. Induced pluripotent stem cells: paths to new medicines. A catalyst for disease modelling, drug discovery and regenerative therapy. EMBO Rep 2010; 11 : 161-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Takahashi K, Yamanaka S. Induction of pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic and adult fibroblast cultures by defined factors. Cell 2006; 126 : 663-76.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Gonzalez Lepez BS, Ortiz Solalinde C, Kubodera TI, Lara Carrillo E, Ortiz Solalinde E. Cleidocranial dysplasia: report of a family. J Oral Sci 2004; 46 : 259-66.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Cohen MM. Jr, Kreiborg S. Perspectives on craniofacial syndromes. Acta Odontol Scand 1998; 56 : 315-20.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Carlson L, Hatcher KW, Vander Burg R. Elevated infant mortality rates among oral cleft and isolated oral cleft cases: a meta-analysis of studies from 1943 to 2010. Cleft Palate Craniofacial J 2013; 50 : 2-12.   Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.Horst OV, Chavez MG, Jheon AH, Desai T, Klein OD. Stem cell and biomaterials research in dental tissue engineering and regeneration. Dent Clin North Am 2012; 56 : 495-520.  Back to cited text no. 7
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed565    
    Printed11    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded192    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal