Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research Indan Journal of Medical Research
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 130  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 327-333

HPV & HPV vaccination : issues in developing countries


1 Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Division of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Dr B.R. Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi (North Campus), Delhi 110 007, India

Correspondence Address:
Bhudev C Das
Dr B.R. Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi (North Campus), Delhi 110 007, India

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 19901442

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Cervical cancer is the second-most common cancer in women worldwide causing most cancer related deaths in women in developing countries including India. The most predominant etiological factor for cervical cancer is persistent infection of certain high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs), while low-risk types are associated with benign cervical lesions and genital warts. In India, the most common (98%) oncogenic types are HPV types 16 and 18 with HPV 16 exclusively (80-90%) prevalent. Two recently developed virus-like particle (VLP) based prophylactic HPV vaccines, quadrivalent Gardasil (HPV 16/18/6/11) and Cervarix (HPV 16/18) offer great promise. Several other therapeutic vaccines are also in clinical trials and are yet to establish their efficacy. The use of already developed VLP vaccines in resource-poor regions is limited by several factors, most importantly the high cost of the vaccine. Therefore efforts are being made in India to develop cost-effective second-generation vaccines. Besides cost, there are several socio-cultural and ethical issues involved with the implementation of already developed vaccines including the acceptability of HPV vaccination by preadolescent girls and their parents in India.


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